Climbing Roses

About Climbing Roses

Those climbing roses whose names start with 'Climbing' or 'Cl' are sports (genetic mutations of the bush varieties of the same name). They generally have a heavy spring bloom followed by scattered blooms throughout the season.

The individual blooms on climbing roses can be of a finer quality and larger than those of the bush form. Climbing roses whose names are not prefaced with ‘Climbing’ or 'Cl' are bred by crossing two roses. They generally have a heavy spring crop followed by a better repeat bloom and usually a good fall crop of blooms with a few exceptions. A few seedling Climbing roses bloom only once and are so noted. Climbing roses are a diverse group with many different heritages, which makes this a wonderfully useful collection of roses. Large flowered climbing roses differ from Ramblers in that they have fewer, yet larger blooms (4-6 inches in size) and are not quite as vigorous. Being so diverse, they vary in winter hardiness, generally climbing roses are hardy zones 5 or 6 through 10 except as unless noted.

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  • Agatha Christie

    Beautiful rich, pink Hybrid Tea shaped blooms that are lightly fragrant. A strong growing disease-resistant climber with outstanding dark-green, glossy foliage. Repeat Bloom Learn More
  • Antique

    A continual blooming, beautiful rose with many petaled 4 1/2" blooms of pink shading to cream. A vigorous, upright, narrow bush with dark-green foliage that is ideal for a free-standing pillar or makes a great show pegged. 50+ petals. Learn More
  • Bantry Bay®

    Bred from 'New Dawn'. High pointed buds open into attractive, deep 4" pink, semi-double blooms with golden centers. A vigorous,continual blooming, easy to grow climber with dark green, glossy foliage. One of the finest climbers. Highly recommended. 17-25 petals. Learn More
  • New Dawn

    4 Review(s)
    The yardstick against which all repeat flowering climbers are judged. In 1997 'New Dawn' was voted the most popular rose in the world at the 11th World Convention of Rose Societies. Silvery, blush-pink, 3" double flowers (petals 15)with nice form produced in profusion on a great repeat blooming plant. May be grown as a shrub, a climber or great for growing into trees. Learn More
  • Pretty In Pink Eden®

    Pretty In Pink Eden® exhibits all the same great qualities of the Eden® Rose, but is deep pink in color. It has slightly more petals than Eden® and is more fragrant. Pretty In Pink Eden® performs well on its own roots and is just as vigorous and resistant to disease as its parent. Learn More
  • Raspberry Cream Twirl

    This rose is the first striped climber with classic, exhibition-type blooms. The large, very full, cuplike blooms offer a deep pink with white stripes and emit a light apple fragrance. This robust plant grows to be 10-12’ tall and 4-5’ wide and has medium, glossy, dark green foliage that is dense and leathery. Its excellent resistance to diseases makes this a wonderful climber that can perform well all over the country. On top of it all, it is almost thornless, making it the perfect rose for cutting, gardens, pillars or high foot-traffic areas. Learn More
  • Zephirine Drouhin

    23 Review(s)
    A climbing Bourbon that may be the most consistently blooming, large flowered climbing rose, with the added benefit that it is thorn-less. The 4" blooms (petals 16) are deep rose-pink, fragrant, and produced in great quantities on a continual blooming bush. Learn More
  • A Shropshire Lad®

    A large, strong-growing shrub for a position further back in the border. It is related to 'Leander' from which it inherits its vigorous, healthy growth and large, glossy foliage. The flowers are soft peachy-pink and of slightly cupped, rosette formation. A most reliable shrub that is easy to grow. Learn More

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